RBS Clears Path to Pay Dividends After $4.9 Billion DOJ Deal

May 10, 2018 | Bloomberg     Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc cleared one of the last barriers keeping the U.K. from reducing its stake in the lender and resuming dividends after it reached a tentative deal to pay $4.9 billion to resolve a U.S. mortgage probe.

Top executives said the U.K.’s biggest government-owned bank will begin discussions with British regulators about restarting dividends after a decade.

“The investment case for this bank is much clearer,” RBS Chief Executive Officer Ross McEwan said on a call with reporters on Thursday. This is “a milestone moment to restore capital distribution,” he said.

A preliminary settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice makes it easier for the U.K. government to attract buyers for its approximate 70 percent stake after bailing out RBS during the financial crisis. Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond welcomed the agreement in principle. “It marks another significant milestone in RBS’s work to resolve its legacy issues, and will help pave the way to a sale of taxpayer-owned shares,” he said in a statement.  Read more here

Fannie and Freddie Give Birth to New Mortgage Bond

The Wall Street Journal |  December 29, 2015     The federal government is trying to get taxpayers off the hook for billions of dollars of potential losses if another mortgage crisis arrives—and in the process, it is quietly giving birth to a new asset class.

Under government control, mortgage-finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac next year plan to ramp up sales of new types of securities that in effect transfer potential losses in a housing downturn to private investors.

Called Connecticut Avenue Securities by Fannie Mae and Structured Agency Credit Risk by Freddie Mac, the securities are essentially bonds whose performance is tied to that of a pool of mortgages. If the mortgages default, investors in the bonds could lose some or all of their principal.  Read more here.

Texas Mortgage Settlement Millions Misspent, Critics Say

News 8 WFAA ABC |  November 9, 2015     Texas homeowners who fell behind and lost their homes during the mortgage crisis were given hope three years ago.

It came in the form of a $25 billion national settlement with five lenders – Ally, Bank of America, Citi, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo – all accused of wrongly forcing people out of their homes.

But how much relief did the State of Texas provide to its citizens?  Read and watch video investigation here.