Credit Suisse Finalizes $5.3 Billion Mortgage Deal with US

CNBC | January 18, 2017         Credit Suisse formally agreed to pay $5.3 billion to settle with U.S. authorities over claims it misled investors in residential mortgage-backed securities it sold in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis, the U.S. Department of Justice said on Wednesday.

Zurich-based Credit Suisse will pay a $2.48 billion cash penalty and provide $2.8 billion in consumer relief, including loan forgiveness and financing for affordable housing, the Justice Department said in a statement.

"The bank concedes that it knew it was peddling investments that were likely to fail," Principal Associate Attorney General Bill Baer said in the statement.

Credit Suisse, which had announced the agreement in principle on Dec. 23, said in a statement it was "pleased to have reached an amicable settlement that allows the bank to put this legacy matter behind it."

Shares of Credit Suisse on the Swiss stock exchange closed down 2.5 percent at 15.28 Swiss francs, a steeper drop than the broader European banking sector.

In a statement of facts, Credit Suisse acknowledged it knew the loans it pooled into securities did not meet underwriting guidelines.  Read more here.

 

JPMorgan Getting Back in the RMBS Game

New securities would be bank's first “house transaction” since the financial crisis

The Real Deal |  March 16, 2016     JPMorgan Chase is dipping back into the mortgage-backed securities market in the banking giant’s first “house transaction” since the financial crisis.

JPMorgan is expected to price a new residential mortgage-backed securities deal, which would pass along most of the credit risk on $1.9 billion in mortgages owned by the bank, over the next two weeks. JPMorgan would hold 90 percent of the deal, keeping the most senior tranches, while selling off riskier pieces to investors.

The deal would be JPMorgan’s first “house transaction,” entirely backed by mortgages it owns, since the financial crisis, according to the Wall Street Journal. The pool backing the securities includes a mix of more than 6,000 mortgages, around 75 percent of which conform with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac underwriting standards.  Read more here.